Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability

HomeJubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability
Jubille Farm USA trains small scale farming for nutrition, sustainability

WORK OVERVIEW

Small-scale agriculture is a method of agriculture that uses less machinery and more human labour. Smallholder Farming for Food Security, Poverty, Livelihoods, Land Tenure, Food Accessibility and Food Sovereignty.

Benefits of small scale agriculture on rural communities is to promote economic development and food security.  Not only is small-scale agriculture an environmental asset due to its tendency to preserving biodiversity, reducing land degradation, and conserving forested areas, small farms are highly beneficial for the social and economic welfare contributing better nutrition for the communities in which they live in.

Small Scale, Big Impact

With some training and support that we offer to the small farmers that are a vast, under-used resource, dominating the agricultural landscape in the Western part of Kenya, with our partners we unlock their potential which is the essential way to reduce hunger.

The single biggest ‘game changer’ in reaching this goal would be greater support and more training for women farmers.  Focusing on women is important because women account for some 60% to 80% of food production in developing countries and yet only 5% of government agricultural services, such as training in agriculture techniques and livestock vaccination programmes, ever reach women farmers.  The single most important thing governments can do to end global hunger is to support the millions of poor women farming tiny plots of land in developing countries and helping women grow more food in their back gardens could be a ‘game changer’, and also calling for greater support for all small farmers. There’s enough food in the world for everyone, but one person in eight still goes hungry every night, and 2.3 million children die needlessly each year from malnutrition.

If you’re the one in eight, there’s a good chance you’re a small-scale farmer living in a developing country, because these farmers make up three-quarters of the world’s hungry.  They work hard to cultivate plots of land of just two hectares or less, equivalent to two or three football pitches in an attempt to feed their families. Most can’t manage to grow enough food adequately.  Hunger and malnutrition could be substantially reduced, if more women had the agricultural training and equipment they needed to successfully grow food on small plots in and around their homes and also to offered complementary support in nutrition, sanitation and health.  We collaborate with Jubilee Farms Bungoma/USA to provide training in home gardens and plots of land for maternal health, nutrition, HIV/AIDS through girls’ football and financial services to women in Western Kenya.

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